What is Good Death?

Window view of the Armenian Church, Vol. 3, No. 3 & 4, 1993

WHAT IS GOOD DEATH?
Issues Related to Death and Dying

by Hratch Tchilingirian

------------------------------------------------
Euthanasia (Greek for "good death"), in general, means "the causing of an easy or painless death to the patient who is 
dying of a terminal illness. Death can be induced by the patient himself without the knowledge or cooperation of any 
other persons. Or it can be effected by others at the request or with the consent of the patient. In all these cases it is called voluntary euthanasia. If death is induced against the will or without the knowledge of the patient, [it is called] 
involuntary euthanasia.1

Hratch Tchilingirian
1993-03-04

read more

The End of the Beginning: The Church in Armenia

Window view of the Armenian Church, Vol. 3, No. 1, 1992

THE END OF THE BEGINNING
The Church in Armenia

by Hratch Tchilingirian

It is the end of the beginning-the euphoria that began with the freedom and independence of Armenia is over. Instead, hardship, struggle and anxiety have become part of everyday living in Armenia. For better or worse, a new era, a new "world order" has commenced in the history of the Armenian nation.

1992-03-01

read more

The Price of Freedom

Window view of the Armenian Church, Vol. 3, No. 1, 1992

THE PRICE OF FREEDOM

Conversation with His Holiness Vazken I 
Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenian
Holy Etchmiadzin, Armenia

By Hratch Tchilingirian

1992-03-01

read more

Church and State Relations in Armenia

Window view of the Armenian Church, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1991

CHURCH AND STATE IN ARMENIA

An Exclusive interview with Ludwig Khachadrian
Minister of Religious Affairs of the Republic of Armenia

By Hratch Tchilingirian

1991-02-03

read more

The Armenian Protestants

Window view of the Armenian Church, Vol. II, No. 3, 1991, pp. 10-12

THE ARMENIAN PROTESTANTS
A Brief History

Compiled by Hratch Tchilingirian

The beginnings of the Armenian Protestant church dates back to the late 19th century. As a movement it was "imported" and "implanted" by American and European missionaries, amidst the "intellectual renaissance" that was taking place in the Armenian community within the boundaries of the Ottoman Empire. Tracing the roots of Armenian Protestantism is not as easy as it may seem. The authors who have written about the subject, while they agree on dates and personalities are divided over the reasons, rationale and effects of the events that lead to the establishment of a separate Armenian Protestant denomination.* The purpose of this article is to give a historical account of events rather than an analysis of the movement.

Hratch Tchilingirian
1991-02-03

read more

The Armenian Church: Glasnost Without Peristroka?

Window  view of the Armenian Church, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1991

The Armenian Church: Glasnost Without Peristroka?

by Hratch Tchilingirian

For the first time in the history of the Armenian Church in the diaspora, an international Conference of Armenian Clergy was held in New York from July 17-21, 1991.

Hratch Tchilingirian
1991-02-02

read more

Canonization of the Genocide Victims

Window view of the Armenian Church, Vol. I, No. 3, January 1990

Canonization of the Genocide Victims: Are We Ready?

by Hratch Tchilingirian

This year is the 75th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide and it seems that the "preparatory activities" are still  continuing... So far the victims of the Genocide have not been canonized. There are several problems with the issue of 
canonizing the victims of the Genocide. However, before going into the discussion of these problems, let us briefly  define what "canonization" is.

Hratch Tchilingirian
1990-01-03

read more

The issue of Homosexuality and the Armenian Church

ASBAREZ ENGLISH EDITION, Saturday, October 7, 1989

The issue of Homosexuality and the Armenian Church

Finding an objective definition of homosexuality is a difficult one, considering the widespread controversy of the issue in the scientific, religious, ethical, and public sphere of society.

Hratch Tchilingirian
1989-10-07

read more

Armenians and A Peace Center In Jerusalem

Armenian Life (Los Angeles) September 4, 1987

Armenians and A Peace Center In Jerusalem

Hratch Tchilingirain

How absurd a notion it is to con sider having a Peace Center in one of the most war-torm regions of the world. Such has been the response I have often received when pursuing the dreams of the Dormition Abbey/a century old Benedictine Monastry in Jerusalem. However, the more shocking idea seems to be participation of Armenians in this endeavor. While there is foundation for skepticism, the most appropriate answer to such a view seems to be - how is it possible that there not be a Center for Peace in the city of Jerusalem, capital of three monotheistic religions — the City of Peace.


 

 

1987-09-04

read more

e-mail: info@hrach.info
Copyright © 2019 Hratch Tchilingirian. All rights reserved.